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med pure cannabinol isolate

CBD is cannabidiol, a phytocannabinoid found in cannabis plants. CBD isolate is CBD that has been isolated from all other plant material through a process of extraction and refining. CBD isolate is available in crystal or powder form.

CBD crystalline can be measured and put into capsules or pills, allowing you to ingest an accurate dose. You can also mix CBD isolate with a variety of ingredients to create CBD-infused food and drinks. However, because CBD is not absorbed very well by the gastrointestinal tract, it has a low oral bioavailability. In order to increase bioavailability, CBD isolate can be added to carrier oils, such as MCT oil, to increase its chances of permeating the gastrointestinal system and reaching the bloodstream.

It depends on who you ask and why they are using CBD. Isolate is best for avoiding any possible trace of THC while full-spectrum may confer the additional benefits of other cannabinoids and terpenes via the entourage effect.

What is the difference between CBD and CBD isolate?

It might not seem as appealing as the well-packaged CBD oil, topicals, or pre-rolls, but CBD crystalline is surprisingly versatile when it comes to consumption, and this pure powder has a number of advantages over other conventional forms of CBD.

When shopping for CBD isolate, it’s important to look for products from reputable companies that are lab-tested by a third party. This should ensure that your isolate doesn’t contain any THC, additional plant materials, or other impurities.

There are various processes used to produce CBD isolate from industrial hemp extracts, such as supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) or ethanol-based extractions. The same extraction methods can also be used as a starting point for the production of THC isolate as well, but typically with marijuana plants instead of industrial hemp. To create an isolate, a number of components are removed from the plant, including other cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids, as well as fats, lipids, and other compounds. After that, the CBD compound is separated from the rest of the extraction through a series of chemical washing and separation processes.

For topicals, mix the CBD isolate with moisturizing oils or lotions and apply it to the area of your skin you’d like to treat. You can also buy topicals that contain CBD isolate.

Devinsky O, Cilio MR, Cross H, et al. Cannabidiol: pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Epilepsia 2014;55(6):791-802. View abstract.

Yadav V, Bever C Jr, Bowen J, et al. Summary of evidence-based guideline: complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis: report of the guideline development subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology. 2014;82(12):1083-92. View abstract.

How does it work ?

Berger BA, Stolz U, Colvin J, Otten EJ. Epidemiology of cannabidiol related cases reported in the National Poison Data System – 2019-2020. Am J Emerg Med. 2021;48:218-223. View abstract.

Kaplan EH, Offermann EA, Sievers JW, Comi AM. Cannabidiol treatment for refractory seizures in Sturge-Weber Syndrome. Pediatr Neurol. 2017 Jun;71:18-23.e2. View abstract.

Laux LC, Bebin EM, Checketts D, et al. Long-term safety and efficacy of cannabidiol in children and adults with treatment resistant Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or Dravet syndrome: Expanded access program results. Epilepsy Res. 2019;154:13-20. View abstract.

Additionally, as many as 26/46 samples (57%) had a THC content > 1%, with one sample peaking at 57.5%. In 18/46 samples (39%) the oil contained virtually only THC (with CBD < 0.1%). Although many of the samples analyzed were purposely made to contain a high THC content, it is unclear whether oil consumers are always aware they are consuming THC, and thereby exposing themselves to the adverse effects of this psychotropic compound, such as intoxication, panic attacks, or disorientation. It should be noted that although the exact legal status of CBD may be debatable, THC-rich extracts are strictly prohibited in virtually all countries.

Increasingly, CBD oil is also being promoted as a prophylactic treatment in order to prevent certain diseases from developing at all. The argument used is that the human endocannabinoid system is involved in basic life functions such as appetite, immune response, reproduction, and pain management [20]. Because CBD functions as an indirect antagonist to human CB1 and CB2 receptors [21], it is reasoned that the presence of CBD prevents them from being overly activated, thereby protecting the nervous and immune systems from everyday stress. Furthermore, CBD is known to be a reasonably potent antioxidant, which further helps to protect against stressful influences [22]. Although this clearly increases the market for CBD products, it also further erodes the scientific basis for the therapeutic use of CBD. After all, it is hard to prove scientifically that a disease was prevented by the use of a health-promoting product.

An excellent example is the use of CBD (and also THC) products for the self-medicating of cancer, with the intention of fully curing it [15]. This is based on an increasing body of preclinical evidence showing cannabinoids to be capable, under some conditions, of inhibiting the development of cancer cells in vitro or in vivo by various mechanisms of action, including induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, and arresting the cell cycle [16]. This is certainly exciting news, and research is ongoing around the world, but there is no solid clinical evidence yet to support that cannabinoids – whether natural or synthetic – can effectively and safely treat cancer in actual humans [17]. In fact, there are indications that certain types of cancer may even accelerate when exposed to cannabinoids [18]. This becomes problematic when patients choose to refuse chemotherapy treatment because they firmly believe in the rumored curative properties of cannabinoids. As a result, recommendation of cannabinoids for treating cancer should be done with great care, and with distinction as to the type of cancer being treated [19].

Table 1.

If CBD oil was used mainly by adult, well-informed, and reasonably healthy consumers, the impact of its widespread use would perhaps be quite acceptable and limited. However, this is not the case, as CBD is actively marketed for use by children (e.g., for Dravet syndrome, ADHD, autism), elderly people (Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, Parkinson’s disease), patients suffering from complex diseases (cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain), and even pets (anxiety, appetite, sleep). Indiscriminate use of CBD may lead to various issues among these consumers. For example, CBD shows an exciting potential for treating epilepsy in children, but the long-term effects of high-dose CBD on these children’s brain functions remain unclear, while there are strong clues that the endocannabinoid system is central in the proper neuronal development of the adolescent brain [23]. In order to halt the unchecked advertising of CBD products, health authorities in various countries have begun sending official warning letters to stop producers and sellers from making unfounded health claims [24, 25].

The fact that the maximum CBD content in an oil is limited by the THC present in the herbal material used makes it attractive to add an additional amount of purified CBD to boost the percentage advertised on the label. Unfortunately, the Novel Food Catalogue of the EU states that “extracts of Cannabis sativa L. in which CBD levels are higher than the CBD levels in the plant source are novel in food” [35]. This means that enriching a natural hemp extract with pure (often synthetic) CBD makes it a Novel Food product, with the consequence that it must undergo significant safety assessment prior to being marketed. However, it is still unclear in many EU countries if extracts with no added CBD also fall under this regime.

Given the many restrictions and conditions, it can be difficult to set up a fully legal and functional pipeline for the production and sale of CBD oil. Because different countries allow different activities with regards to cultivation, processing, extracting, etc., of hemp, entrepreneurs have often set up production pipelines that span multiple countries, where hemp is cultivated in one country, while extraction takes place in another, lab testing in a third, and sales take place in yet another country. This obviously makes it harder to determine exactly where a CBD product comes from, who is responsible for its final quality, and what standards were followed. For that reason, thorough analytical testing of final products by certified third-party labs is an essential tool to guarantee the safety and composition of CBD oils.

Recently, an interesting study performed in the Netherlands highlighted multiple issues that may be extrapolated to CBD products elsewhere [51]. In this study, 46 different cannabis oil samples were collected directly from patients and analyzed for cannabinoid content. The obtained samples were home-made (n = 29) or purchased from a (web) store (n = 17). For 21 of the 46 products (46% of all samples), label information was available on CBD/THC content, so that the claimed content could be compared to the analyzed content as determined in the study. Results are shown in Table 1. In many cases the analyzed cannabinoid content strongly differed from the claimed content on the label, while in 7 samples no cannabinoids (CBD or THC) were found at all. Such deviations were found in home-made as well as commercially obtained products.