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hemp scam

New York’s Hudson Hemp farm grows industrial hemp, which is used to produce CBD isolate. Jeremy Sachs Michaels/Hudson Hemp

There are a few ways to get CBD into your body. The most common, used in both clinical trials and consumer products, is via an oil in which CBD, which is naturally soluble in fat, has been dissolved. CBD oil can be taken orally, inhaled as a vape, or applied topically. Topical application is supposed to work sort of the way Icy Hot does, affecting a local muscle area specifically to reduce aches and pains, but the other methods produce full-brain and -body effects.

So how can you be sure that your CBD oil actually contains what the package says it does?

The dosages in consumer CBD products are very low

CBD is derived by growing cannabis, drying it out, pulverizing it, and then, often, using a rotary evaporator filled with an ethanol solvent to extract the CBD. (There are some other methods, but the ethanol one is common.) It’s a pretty old and fairly low-tech technique, but it’s effective. What you end up with is, hopefully, about 99 percent pure CBD in the form of white powder, which is called CBD isolate. (Some CBD is billed as “full spectrum,” which means it contains other things from the cannabis plant, like a bunch of other cannabinoids, but there’s no formal definition for full spectrum.)

The few CBD studies out there give us limited information, and hardly any about recreational CBD use. One study gave people different amounts of ingested CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg), as well as, for comparison, a placebo and Klonopin; those people then had to give a public speech, an action associated with high levels of anxiety in the broad populace. Neither 100 mg nor 900 mg, nor the placebo, had any effect. The 300 mg dose, though, did have a measurable calming effect on heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. (The Klonopin also worked.)

Hudson Hemp caters to high-end CBD companies, and its accountability is unusual. Vast amounts of CBD products are sold online and in stores without any documentation or transparency. Online retailers say whatever they want. Big marketplaces, from eBay to Alibaba, sell mysterious vials of oil with odd labels, and people buy them.

Hudson Hemp began growing industrial hemp through a New York state pilot program that began in late 2017. Industrial hemp is extremely low in or entirely free of THC and is grown for fiber, hempseed oil, and, increasingly, CBD. Hudson Hemp grows Cherry Wine, one of several varieties, or strains, of the cannabis plant that have been bred to remove THC (which remains illegal in New York) and maximize CBD yield. Some strains are naturally high in CBD and very low in THC; others are high in THC and low in CBD; still others have similar levels of each.

Please be advised that Maggie is not associated with this product or business in any way and we understand it to be a scam.

We are aware that there are a series of sneaky CBD gummies & hemp oil advertisements circulating online that is falsely using Maggie’s name and images and indicating that she is an endorser.

Please don’t click on links or give any personal information or payment details to these people, they will take your money.

As of August 2021, we can only find one legitimate connection between Shark Tank and CBD: former Shark Tank investor Kevin Harrington has officially endorsed a CBD company.

ABC’s Shark Tank is a popular show about entrepreneurship and investing. CBD gummies are also popular. However, the two worlds have never crossed over. To date, no CBD company has ever appeared on Shark Tank.

Many CBD gummies advertise themselves online with claims of being featured on Shark Tank. However, no CBD gummy product has ever been featured on Shark Tank. If you see a CBD gummy company talking about being featured on Shark Tank, then you’re likely being scammed.

Former Shark Kevin Harrington Has Endorsed a CBD Company

Step 3) As you scroll down the page, you see additional indicators that the CBD gummies are legitimate. You might see Facebook comments, glowing reviews from ‘verified purchasers’, and other signs you’re dealing with a legitimate CBD company.

Some of the reasons Shark Tank CBD gummies are a scam include:

Overpriced CBD Product: You can buy CBD gummies for anywhere from $5 to $100, depending on the brand, the quality, and other indicators. When you buy Shark Tank CBD products online, you’re likely paying a premium price tag (because you believe the gummies have been featured on Shark Tank) for an inferior product.

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