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Countries Where CBD is Stuck in a Legal Grey Area

It’s important to be an informed consumer if you want to avoid the scams and get the best value for your money.

Why You Should Buy CBD Online and Not Locally

We generally prefer to buy CBD products online. There are a few undeniable advantages that purchasing CBD online has over shopping in-store:

Only use products that have been tested by a third-party lab. Save yourself the hassle and pick a company that has nothing to hide.

(All prices are listed in $ per mg CBD)

We hope this article helped you understand why shopping for CBD oil on Amazon and at Whole Foods Market may not be the most reliable path. If you have any questions, which most do, we’re here for you! We’re happy to discuss any of your CBD questions more in depth so feel free to contact us!.

Let’s analyze Amazon’s top two products when you search for “cbd oil” on their site. This is what comes up:

At Anavii Market, we’re here to help your wellness journey through education and our curated collection of high-quality CBD products. All products on our site have passed our industry leading verification process. Our promise is personal.

While living in the age of Amazon and Whole Foods can be convenient, shopping small is your best bet for health-related products like hemp-derived CBD Oil.

Wow – there are so many red flags here! Let’s go through some of them:

Now, let’s compare one of Anavii Market’s top selling CBD oil products, Ananda Hemp Full Spectrum CBD, with the fake CBD oil on Amazon:

Ultimately, the fake CBD oil on Amazon is out to trick you, so make sure you take the correct precautions to not get fooled! Real, natural wellness is not necessarily a two day shipping promise!

In addition, big businesses work best when they can scale operations. With niche products like hemp-derived CBD oil, it is important to ensure products are third-party tested in order to verify their contents. Small businesses sell less products so can more easily perform these tests with care. Small businesses are also more nimble and can more quickly adapt to any new developments in testing, as well as adding new products to the shelves.

The CBD product market’s potential, however, has drawn the interest of retailers large and small, though many remain uncertain about the regulatory framework regarding the sale and labeling of hemp-containing products, even as various CBD offerings make their way into stores.

“Our shoppers have expressed a growing interest in CBD products,” according to Jennifer Coleman, global senior category merchant at Whole Foods.

Under current federal law, CBD and THC can’t be added to a food or marketed as a dietary supplement. The Food and Drug Administration maintains regulatory oversight of food, cosmetics, drugs and other products within its jurisdiction that have CBD, THC or the cannabis plant as an additive.

Whole Foods said it’s also adding exclusive CBD bath items from Pacha Soap Co. (left), including CBD Mineral Soak, CBD Whipped Soap, CBD Bar Soap and CBD Froth Bombs. The retailer noted that the new CBD products meet its body care quality standards, which ban parabens, phthalates, triclosan and more than 100 other questionable ingredients used in conventional body care products. (Photo courtesy of Whole Foods.)

New states where Whole Foods stores sell topical CBD items include Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.

From Oct. 4 to 6, Whole Foods plans to offer beauty and body care products – including topical CBD and the new Pacha Soap Co. bath items – at 25% off as part of the chain’s fall Beauty, Bath and Body Care Sale. Prime members get an extra 10% off the discounted price.

Late last year, the federal government changed its classification of cannabis with the enactment of the Farm Bill. The legislation removed hemp from the Federal Controlled Substances Act’s definition of marijuana. That meant hemp was no longer a controlled substance under federal law, even though marijuana remains a Schedule I drug.