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cbd oil to treat ms

CBD, on the other hand, has none of these psychoactive properties – it won’t get you any more ‘high’ than a tablet of ibuprofen will. Rather, the molecule functions as an “endocannabinoid supplement”; that is to say, our bodies are chock-full of 100% natural cannabinoid receptors that work hand-in-hand with 100% natural endocannabinoids.

At the end of the day, due to its all-powerful financial hand, Big Pharma will likely have the final say in terms of what’s going to be available in terms of treatment, and what’s not.

As for prevalence, multiple sclerosis is a relatively rare disease. It affects about 400,000 people in the U.S. and about 2 million more worldwide. While researchers are in the dark as to what triggers MS, we do know some things about it. For instance, we know that women of northern European descent between the ages of 20 and 55 are most at risk.

CBD, Multiple Sclerosis, and What You Need to Know

Prescription MS drugs can present side effects similar to those of chemotherapy. Can CBD act as a safer, more effective alternative?

Will the U.S. Government’s patent limit the likelihood that CBD gets approved as a multiple sclerosis treatment? Only time will tell…

Multiple sclerosis exists in four different stages, or “disease courses.” Conventional treatments and prescriptions depend on which particular stage a patient is in. In order of increasing severity, the four courses of MS are:

Does CBD work for multiple sclerosis? Early research shows promising signs…

In November 2018, the UK government legalised cannabis for medicinal use, but also put a strict criteria in place for who could access it. Only specialist doctors are allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis, and so far only a handful of people have benefited from the change in law.

There’s a medically approved cannabis-based treatment called Sativex, but it doesn’t work for everyone. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland it’s approved for use on the NHS for ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ spasticity (muscle spasms and stiffness). But you can have it only if other treatments haven’t worked. It’s not yet approved in Scotland but we hope it soon will be.

One in five people with multiple sclerosis (MS) surveyed in 2014 told us they’d used cannabis to help with their symptoms. They said it can help with muscle spasms or stiffness (spasticity) and pain.

Cannabis is made up of compounds called cannabinoids. The main ones studied for their therapeutic effect are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which gets you ‘high’, and cannabidiol (CBD), which doesn’t.

Some people with MS use cannabis in a variety of ways to help ease their symptoms.

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “What is marijuana?”

Harvard Medical School: “Cannabidiol (CBD) — what we know and what we don’t.”

It comes in many forms. You can find CBD in:

What to Watch For

Experts say taking 300 milligrams a day by mouth for up to 6 months might be safe. Taking 1,500 milligrams per day by mouth for up to 1 month may be OK, too. People have used 2.5-milligram sprays under their tongue for up to 2 weeks.

Eating foods that are high in fat can cause your body to absorb more CBD. This can lead to side effects. It could react with other medications you’re taking, such as blood thinners. Be sure to talk to your doctor before trying any form of CBD.

CBD oil is a common way to take it. You can put it under your tongue or add it to your food or drinks. You can also put it on your skin. Some research found sprays you put under your tongue might be best for MS.

The FDA hasn’t approved CBD to treat multiple sclerosis, or MS. Studies are ongoing, but the evidence is mixed. Here’s what we know.