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cbd oil sales in ohio

Getting caught with 100 grams of marijuana or less is a misdemeanor that can get you a mere fine of approximately $150 if that’s your first offense. If you get busted with amounts between 100 grams and 200 grams, you can face criminal charges involving 30 days in jail and a fine of $250.

However, there’s a catch created by the Ohio Board of Pharmacy. The board has recently banned stores other than state-licensed marijuana dispensaries from selling any cannabis-derived products.

The state of Ohio only accepts hemp-derived CBD oil under the new federal law, but marijuana and its derivatives are prohibited for recreational use. Only qualifying patients can obtain marijuana-derived CBD.

Marijuana CBD Oil in Ohio

Shopping for CBD online gives you access to important information about the company, such as the source of their hemp, extraction methods, third-party testing, and more. When you visit a physical store, you rely solely on the owner’s knowledge, and such stores aren’t usually run by the industry’s experts.

Can you legally buy CBD oil in Ohio if it comes from hemp?

Why does the state of Ohio have different laws for hemp and marijuana?

Royal CBD – Full Spectrum

Although the laws don’t allow patients to smoke marijuana, they are permitted to use tinctures, vape oil, edibles, plant material, and patches.

Beyond having an eligible medical condition, there are a few more basic requirements to apply for a medical marijuana card in Ohio.

How Do I Get a Medical Marijuana Card in Ohio?

The recommending physician must have a Certificate to Recommend (CTR) medical marijuana. If your doctor doesn’t have one, you can find a list of doctors here.

On September 8, 2016, Ohio passed House Bill 523, which made medical marijuana legal.

As the industry continues to expand, more companies are hoping to get their share of the cash; this means that many low-quality CBD products are sold in-store.

SB 57 requires licenses for growing or processing hemp are valid for three years and are not available to anyone convicted of drug-related charges in the past 10 years. No license is required to sell or purchase CBD in Ohio.

There are no possession limits for hemp-derived CBD at this time. CBD products with more than 0.3% THC remains illegal to sell, possess, and consume unless registered under Ohio’s medical marijuana program.

There are no possession limits for hemp-derived CBD at this time. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Ohio CBD possession limits

In accordance with federal law, Ohio’s bill set the standard for hemp versus marijuana at a 0.3% THC cutoff. In Ohio, CBD is legal for use in food, dietary supplements, cosmetics, and personal care products, among other products. According to Ohio law, hemp growers and processors must be licensed and CBD products must be tested, though both of those processes are still being worked out by state lawmakers.

Ohio is developing licensing procedures for hemp growers and processors. Licenses are not required to sell or purchase hemp or CBD products. Consumers should soon find CBD-infused items available in more places, though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), placed in charge of hemp and CBD products under the 2018 Farm Bill, is still developing rules and cautions buyers to choose carefully.

The 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act categorized all types of cannabis, including hemp, as Schedule I, defined as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction. The act prevented further research that may have shed light on beneficial uses for cannabis.

The 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp from the list of controlled substances, though marijuana with more than 0.3% THC remains illegal at the federal level and in states without medical or recreational legalization. CBD derived from marijuana plants is, therefore, still illegal while hemp-derived CBD is legal.