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As previously announced in the MJNA press release dated September 5 , MJNA portfolio company, Red Dice Holdings, recently launched its Hemp-based high concentrate CBD health and wellness products, Dixie X, for over-the-counter sales. These Cannabidiol products represent the highest strength of CBD products on the market today, and this same concentrate will soon be used to launch the CanChew Biotechnologies line of CBD-enriched chewing gum. Click here for recent production news from PhytoSphere. Dixie X can currently be purchased in over 100 retail locations in Colorado , Arizona and New Mexico as well as on-line by anyone living in the U.S. at www.dixiex.com.

Desprez said he is hopeful clinical trials will begin immediately. He currently has grant funding through the National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the U.S. Department of Defense and the California Breast Cancer Research Program.

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SAN DIEGO , Sept. 21, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Medical Marijuana Inc. (OTC: MJNA), a leading hemp industry innovator, is pleased to report on a September 18 San Francisco Chronicle Article, "Pot compound seen as tool against cancer."

Sep 21, 2012, 09:06 ET

Medical Marijuana Inc. does not grow, sell or distribute any substances that violate United States Law or the controlled substance act.

A large, retrospective cohort study of 64,855 men aged 15 to 49 years from the United States found that Cannabis use was not associated with tobacco-related cancers and a number of other common malignancies. However, the study did find that, among nonsmokers of tobacco, ever having used Cannabis was associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer.[9]

An Israeli retrospective observational study assessed the impact of Cannabis use during nivolumab immunotherapy.[10] One hundred forty patients with advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, and renal cell carcinoma received the checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (89 patients received nivolumab alone and 51 patients received nivolumab plus Cannabis). In a multivariate model, Cannabis was the only significant factor that reduced the response rate to immunotherapy (37.5% in patients who received nivolumab alone compared with 15.9% in patients who received nivolumab plus Cannabis [odds ratio, 3.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.24–8.1; P = .016]). There was no difference in progression-free survival or overall survival. A subsequent prospective observational study from the same investigators followed 102 patients with metastatic cancers initiating immunotherapy.[11][Level of evidence: 2Dii] Sixty-eight patients received immunotherapy alone while 34 patients used Cannabis during immunotherapy. Over half of the patients in each group had stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Cannabis users were less likely to receive immunotherapy as a first-line intervention (24%) compared with nonusers (46%) (P = .03). Cannabis users showed a significantly lower percentage of clinical benefit (39% of Cannabis users with complete or partial responses or stable disease compared with 59% of nonusers [P = .035]). In this analysis, the median time to tumor progression was 3.4 months in Cannabis users compared with 13.1 months in nonusers and the overall survival was 6.4 months in Cannabis users compared with 28.5 months in nonusers. The investigators also noted that Cannabis users reported a lower rate of overall treatment-related adverse experiences compared with nonusers, with fewer immune-related adverse events (P = .057). The investigators postulated that this finding may be related to the possible immunosuppressive effects of Cannabis and concluded that Cannabis consumption should be carefully considered in patients with advanced malignancies who are treated with immunotherapy.

Cancer Treatment

At least 50% of patients who receive moderately emetogenic chemotherapy may experience delayed chemotherapy-induced N/V. Although selective neurokinin 1 antagonists that inhibit substance P have been approved for delayed N/V, a study was conducted before their availability to assess dronabinol, ondansetron, or their combination in preventing delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced N/V.[42] Ondansetron, a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist, is one of the mainstay agents in the current antiemetic armamentarium. In this trial, the primary objective was to assess the response 2 to 5 days after moderately to severely emetogenic chemotherapy. Sixty-one patients were analyzed for efficacy. The total response—a composite endpoint—including nausea intensity, vomiting/retching, and use of rescue medications, was similar with dronabinol (54%), ondansetron (58%), and combination therapy (47%) when compared with placebo (20%). Nausea absence was greater in the active treatment groups (dronabinol 71%, ondansetron 64%, combination therapy 53%) when compared with placebo (15%; P < .05 vs. placebo for all). Occurrence rates for nausea intensity and vomiting/retching episodes were the lowest in patients treated with dronabinol, suggesting that dronabinol compares favorably with ondansetron in this situation where a substance P inhibitor would currently be the drug of choice.

In 1951, Congress passed the Boggs Act, which for the first time included Cannabis with narcotic drugs. In 1970, with the passage of the Controlled Substances Act, marijuana was classified by Congress as a Schedule I drug. Drugs in Schedule I are distinguished as having no currently accepted medicinal use in the United States. Other Schedule I substances include heroin, LSD, mescaline, and methaqualone.

A comprehensive Health Canada monograph on marijuana concluded that while there are many cellular and molecular studies that provide strong evidence that inhaled marijuana is carcinogenic, the epidemiologic evidence of a link between marijuana use and cancer is still inconclusive.[20]

Is there a role for marijuana in the management of cancer patients?

Anxiety and Sleep

— The singer and actress updates fans on her battle, but can marijuana help?

No ongoing clinical trials of cannabis as a treatment for cancer in humans were identified in a PubMed search. The only published trial of any cannabinoid in patients with cancer is a small pilot study of intratumoral injection of delta-9-THC in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme, which demonstrated no significant clinical benefit.

“I researched a lot and felt satisfied with my course of treatment. It was sort of an East meets West approach. I meditated every day, did yoga, and homeopathy, ate well — I boosted my inner strength as much as I could. When bad thoughts came in, I pushed them right out.”

The cannabis plant produces resin containing psychoactive compounds called cannabinoids, in addition to other compounds found in plants, such as terpenes and flavonoids. In the U.S., it is a controlled substance and is classified as a Schedule I agent (a drug with a high potential for abuse, and no currently accepted medical use).