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“Your endocannabinoid system—the receptors that are impacted by CBD—is deeper in your skin, so until we see a clinical trial on how oils penetrate and at which dose, look for higher milligrams of CBD in your oils if you want to see an effect,” advises Palermino. (While there are no exact dosing guidelines, you can consider 100 milligrams in a one-ounce dropper bottle a low dose, she adds.) At the end of the day, with any kind of CBD product, it’s important to be a savvy and somewhat skeptical shopper, given that the industry is self-regulated and lacks any clear cut rules or guidelines.

There are also a fair amount of topical CBD oils out there, though keep in mind that these fall into a bit of a different category than other topical CBD products out there when it comes to their effects. “Oils are great at softening and moisturizing, but they tend to sit on top, rather than sink into the skin,” explains Charlotte Palermino, co-founder of the cannabis education website Nice Paper. And this means they’re not necessarily going to be the best delivery system for active ingredients, CBD included, she points out. The upshot of this? If you’re just dipping your toe into the CBD pool, using a topical oil can be one way to ensure you’re getting not quite as much of the ingredient. And, on the flip side, if you do really want to reap the benefits, you can simply choose products with a higher concentration of CBD.

These days, CBD is just about as well-known as the ABCs. CBD, which stands for cannabidiol, is a plant-based compound (a cannabinoid) found in the flowers and leaves of the hemp plant. The jury is still somewhat out when it comes to hard-hitting scientific evidence about the benefits of CBD; most experts agree that more research is needed. But the anecdotal evidence is there and CBD proponents—as well as many users—claim that it can calm anxiety to improve sleep, knock out period cramps, reduce redness and inflammation in the skin, and way more.

But if you’re not sure where to start, try any of these best CBD oils that are worth the hype.

Meanwhile, “CBD isolate is the purest version of CBD. It doesn’t contain any other compounds that you find in a hemp plant,” tells Pekar. “This form of CBD oil is best for facial skin as it’s pure, doesn’t clog pores and is packed with skin-rejuvenating antioxidants,” adds the aesthetician.

“Full-spectrum CBD oil contains all the compounds found in hemp, including trace amounts of THC. Broad-spectrum CBD oil, on the other hand, contains a range of cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids derived from hemp, but no THC,” explains Ed Donnelly, CBD expert and founder of AmourCBD.

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“The government’s position on CBD is confusing,” notes Dr. Peter Grinspoon in a Harvard Health report.

How to choose the right CBD skincare product?

According to the 2018 Farm Bill, cannabinoids derived from industrial hemp, containing less than 0.3% THC, are legal.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a natural compound found in Cannabis sativa plants, which include marijuana and hemp plants. Lately, there’s a lot of hype around skin products infused with CBD. You can find it in cosmetics like creams, lotions, balms, oils, face masks, shampoos, and even bath bombs.

Experts want to see more reliable research before they recommend CBD for your skin. But if you do decide to use CBD-infused skin products and notice a reaction, tell your doctor about it. If you have skin problems, talk to a dermatologist for diagnosis and treatment options.

Popular Claims on Benefits

CBD, especially if taken by mouth, can damage your liver. There’s not yet information on whether CBD products can have the same effect when you apply it on your skin. For instance, it’s not clear yet how much CBD gets absorbed through your skin.

Mayo Clinic: “Psoriasis,” “Atopic dermatitis (eczema).”

Experts say there needs to be more research on proper dosage, long-term benefits, and side effects to know if it’s safe and effective, especially if you plan to use it as part of your daily skin routine.