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cbd oil for bipolar disorder

There are many different ways you can take CBD. Here, we’ll discuss the most common options in detail and how they can be used alongside a bipolar diagnosis.

There are three primary types of episodes experienced by those with bipolar disorder.

It’s best to start with a low dosage and build up gradually over time until you find relief from your symptoms.

Medications Used to Control Bipolar Symptoms

With that said, you can use our dosage calculator below to find the approximate dose based on your weight and desired strength.

For a condition such as bipolar disorder, it’s important to be consistent with your CBD use — something that edibles aren’t always able to provide.

There’s some evidence that CBD can help, but there are a few cautions to be aware of too.

This makes the condition hard to treat, and much of the treatment in a hospital is done through trial and error — patients try a drug and wait to see if it produces results. If not, they try the next one in line until they find something that relieves their symptoms.

Some of the common side effects of pharmaceutical medications include their addictive potential, difficulty sleeping, manic depression, weight gain, and suicidal ideation.

Most experts recommend starting with a low dose and gradually increasing it until you find the desired relief from your bipolar disorder. Many bipolar patients experience benefits upon reaching a medium- or high-strength dose. The amount of CBD oil you’ll need to notice the positive change depends on the severity of your symptoms and your overall health. The only way to determine your effective dosage range is to try it out.

Cannabinoids & Our Health

Taking CBD for bipolar disorder doesn’t carry a risk of life-threatening side effects. In fact, CBD has been mentioned by several studies as a safe and well tolerable compound. In humans, examined dosages ranged between 300–1,500 mg of CBD daily. However, there are a few mild reactions you should keep in mind when using CBD oil for bipolar disorder. Since most people with the condition benefit from medium- to high-strength doses, you may experience the following side effects:

Researchers have yet to find the underlying cause of the bipolar disorder, although the most likely explanation involves imbalances between specific neurotransmitters in the brain. As mentioned earlier, bipolar disorder is difficult to treat. People usually go through trial and error, most often trying one medication and waiting to see if it improves the symptoms. If not, another drug is prescribed until the symptoms become manageable.

Below we share the current scientific findings regarding the use of CBD for bipolar disorder.

In the course of her research, Gobbi has spoken with the patients using CBD oil without medial oversight. She warned them that there has been very little testing into its effect on humans, and there isn't much scientific data to support the health claims.

"A lot of patients have contacted me from all over Canada, and [are] using cannabidiol to treat depression, bipolar disorder," said Dr. Gabriella Gobbi, a psychiatrist at McGill University's faculty of medicine and the McGill University Health Centre.

The cannabis extract is non-psychoactive and does not produce a high. It has been touted as a relief for everything from chronic pain to insomnia.

More clinical trials needed into cannabidiol's alleged health benefits: researcher

Some of the patients she spoke to still elected to use CBD oil, instead of other treatments that have been proven to be effective for conditions like bipolar disorder, she told The Current's guest host Matt Galloway.

"It means they're not treated at all, so this is very, very worrisome in our society because people are not cured at the end of the day."

People suffering from serious conditions are forgoing doctor visits in favour of self-medicating with CBD oil, according to one "very worried" researcher.

Retailers were struggling to keep CBD oil on the shelves earlier this year, after anecdotal endorsements helped boost its popularity. But Gobbi warned that positive stories, without scientific testing, could be a "placebo effect."