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cbd oil contain thc

Cannabis is the umbrella term describing hemp and marijuana plants—two different varieties of the cannabis genus. Both marijuana and hemp can be described as cannabis plants; however, it is important to note that they are still two separate plants.

CBD oil extracted from hemp is not supposed to have any more than .3 percent of THC. However, it’s not uncommon for sellers to mislabel their products as THC-free hemp when in reality, it’s a low-quality oil extracted from marijuana, which does contain THC.

Study of CBD Oil

As it turns out, depending on the source of the cannabis that is used to produce the CBD oil, some products do contain traces of THC (including low-quality isolates and many full-spectrum tinctures).

CBD (cannabidiol) oil is a popular product for everything from pain control to anxiety to promoting sleep. However, with the rise of CBD comes the concern about failing a drug test due to detection of CBD oil. News stories are emerging across the country involving famous sports players, employees of companies, and others who have gotten positive drug screening results for the presence of THC—the psychoactive component of marijuana —even though CBD oil is said to be THC-free.

In a study conducted by researchers from the Lautenberg Center, researchers discovered that CBD was more effective for treating inflammation and pain when used with other cannabis plant compounds derived from a full spectrum product over a CBD isolate product alone. This is one reason that full spectrum products (those containing THC) are popular.

So for these consumers, the question inevitably arises: Do CBD products contain THC?

If you’re open to trying cannabis products that are high in CBD and low in THC, you may be interested to know that CBD has the potential to mitigate the intoxicating and potentially adverse effects of THC, while THC may contribute to or enhance the therapeutic effects of CBD. THC and CBD elicit responses from the human body by binding to cannabinoid receptors.

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The second-most-prominent cannabinoid of the cannabis plant, cannabidiol (CBD) has become valued in recent years for being non-intoxicating — as opposed to intoxicating tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the cannabinoid responsible for the cannabis “high” — while also offering a variety of potential health benefits. Many consumers who take CBD oil say they do so because they want the medicinal benefits associated with cannabis without the effects of THC.

It’s a question asked more frequently than ever, as CBD formulas are popping up in spas, large retailers, coffee houses, online shops, and major pharmacies across the country.

While CBD isolate might in some ways function as a more potent or concentrated form of CBD, it may be less effective since isolate does not metabolize in your body alongside the other potentially important cannabinoids and terpenes. While some prefer the peace of mind of knowing there’s nothing but CBD in their oil, gummies, or tincture, there’s scientific evidence that consuming full-spectrum products, with all the goodies from the plant, delivers better results via the entourage effect.

Given that context, it’s important to understand how the compounds interact with drug screening tests, said Grace Kroner, lead researcher on the new study.

Licensed farmers can now grow the plant, as long as it contains less than 0.3% THC. The result? CBD is turning up in everything from oils and lotions to coffee and cookies.

Legally, Kroner noted, CBD products should only be produced from hemp plants with no more than 0.3% THC. But there’s no way for consumers to know for sure what’s in the products they buy.

“Confirmatory testing should be done before any clinical decisions are made,” she said.

According to Robert Fitzgerald, a professor at the University of California, San Diego’s Center for Advanced Laboratory Medicine, “It would depend on the purity of the product.”