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cbd oil coffee

Caffeine pills usually contain 100 or 200 mg each.

Updated on July 22, 2021

Bulletproof coffee is a combination of coffee and a source of fat — usually grass-fed butter or MCT oil from coconuts.

Can I Stack Caffeine Pills With CBD Oil?

Caffeine, the active ingredient in coffee, is by far the most popular stimulant on earth. It’s estimated that over 2.2 billion cups of coffee are consumed every day.

It can make us feel jittery, anxious — sometimes, we can even feel our heart skipping beats or pounding out of our chest. All of these effects actually hurt our ability to be productive — counteracting the very reason for using it.

One of the best-known uses of CBD oil is for treating anxiety.

You can also take CBD capsules alongside your coffee, or buy CBD-infused coffee beans.

Erin Magner writing for Well+Good said that some people report that mixing CBD with coffee amplifies alertness while taking the edge off of the sometimes harsh effects of caffeine. If downing an espresso leaves you feeling a little wired, a dash of CBD might mellow out that impact. “What I hear from people is that they’re able to experience that nice, alert, focused energy of coffee without any of the jitters,” Jewel Zimmer, founder of cannabis and CBD oil brand Juna, told Well+Good.

Once 2018 was declared the year of CBD, it seemed like you couldn’t stop hearing about the product. The cannabis compound, which doesn’t cause a high, has been shown to reduce anxiety, help you sleep, reduce inflammation, and more positive health effects. Whether you prefer chocolates, candies, ice cream, or lattes, CBD product developers never seem to cease expanding upon their creative offerings. But, what are the effects of mixing CBD with caffeine? Doesn’t combining stimulating caffeine with supposedly soothing CBD seem kind of. counterintuitive?

“It’s unclear at this point in time the exact interaction between CBD and caffeine,” she said. “At low doses, CBD is a stimulant and in higher doses it can cause sedation. Someone’s reaction to a combination of these compounds would not be easily predictable because various doses of each would affect the response.”

While the potential health-boosting effects of CBD have been documented, research about what happens when you mix CBD with caffeine is a little hit or miss. Part of the reason for this is that, until recently, CBD, which is derived from the hemp plant (not the marijuana plant), was lumped in with marijuana in terms of legality, which made acquiring federal funding for research far more difficult. Thanks to the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, however, it’s suggested that the market for cannabis products (and research into how they work) will boom even further in 2019.

That said, there are some studies that have looked at what happens when you mix the two. A study published in The Journal of Internal Medicine found that coffee and cannabis activate some of the same pathways in the brain. "The neurotransmitters related to the endocannabinoid system — the same ones affected by cannabis —decreased after drinking four to eight cups of coffee in a day. That’s the opposite of what occurs after someone uses cannabis," a press release about the study emailed to Bustle said.

As to the exact effects of mixing the stuff with caffeine, a lot more research needs to happen — but there’s a lot of anecdotal evidence out there. While you might think that the jolt of your morning brew might cancel out your CBD-induced chill, anecdotally, this isn’t always the case. Dr. Bonni Goldstein, MD, the medical director of Canna-Centers, told Cady Drell writing for Marie Claire that figuring out how someone with react to CBD is a case-by-case thing — and the effects of mixing it with coffee aren’t fully understood.

Despite this push towards legitimizing CBD research, New York City’s health department recently told restaurants that CBD could not be served in edibles (like lattes) because it was "not safe as a food additive," according to Eater. CBD is still legal to sell on its own in other forms (and you’re certainly free to spike your own latte), but the decision has cast doubt over the safety and efficacy of the ever-popular CBD lattes.

Following Kush Queen’s advice, I added my second dose of CBD to my cup of coffee at my coworking space, which made me feel both illicit and cool—despite the fact that I was wearing socks with pumpkins on them and everyone else around me was conducting business in chic heels and cool boots. This, perhaps, may be the strongest effect of CBD: the cool factor. It’s trendy. It’s also kind of expensive (the 1-ounce bottle of CBD cost $35.99, and a bottle this size has roughly 30 droppers full, making each dose over a dollar per serving), so I consider it a luxury product.

Knowing that I’d be documenting my CBD experience, I was hyper aware of any changes that may occur with my chemically enhanced coffee routine. Only, none came. (At least, noticeably.) My morning continued as usual: reading Travel & Leisure magazine, checking and responding to emails, and commuting via the New York City ferry to Manhattan’s financial district, where I had lunch at Manhatta and cleaned my plate.

I didn’t think CBD worked until, well, it did. I think. I’d once taken a small CBD gummy the week before my wedding and ended up lying flat on my back on my Brooklyn rooftop, watching planes slowly zoom overhead, feeling just. weird. Was this what relaxation felt like? Or was this a total placebo effect situation, with me just totally zoning out before the biggest week of my life?

The effects of CBD coffee

Theoretically, the effects of ingested CBD should kick in about 45 minutes to two hours after the substance is consumed, and there’s not quite enough info to know how long the effects last. People feel the effects differently too, or not at all. By the time I left lunch, battled the rain, and hopped on the subway, the CBD should have kicked in (if not worn off). But I wasn’t totally aware of any major changes it incurred in my mood or behavior that day.

Due to the aforementioned anxiety, I’ve tried to cut back on my coffee intake. This means one cup in the morning and another (OK, two more) in the afternoon. Though CBD is thought to help some go to sleep at night, the idea of starting my morning with a caffeine boost and some zen CBD relaxation was appealing, so I added a dose (33 milligrams) of Kush Queen’s Bare Daily Wellness Supplement Full Spectrum CBD to my morning brew.

As a general statement, I am an anxious, not-at-all-chill, never-relaxed person. This personality type works for me. It’s how, within minutes of being commissioned this article by my editor, I agreed to try CBD in my coffee, got my hands on some unflavored CBD oil, and experimented with my own mental state.

CBD, short for cannabidiol, has become nearly synonymous with wellness in the past year. Derived from hemp, CBD is the compound thought to make users feel relaxed. THC, on the other hand, is the chemical compound in cannabis that makes users feel high. The science is still lacking on what exactly a dose of CBD can do for you, but some believe it can be used to treat anxiety, though the research on that is inconclusive. Still, it’s pretty clear that CBD isn’t harmful, whether or not it’s actually helpful, so it seems worth trying if you want to shell out the cash and hope for the best.