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cbd oil and ms

People with RRMS suffer from periodical fare-ups that exacerbate their symptoms, followed by silent periods where the patient remains symptom-free until the next flare-up.

THC is a well-known pain reliever — this may explain the need for higher levels of THC in CBD products for treating MS symptoms.

Secondary-Progressive (SPMS)

CBD oil from hemp is legal in all 50 states. You can find it in cannabis dispensaries, head shops, and online stores. You don’t need a doctor’s prescription to try CBD oil for multiple sclerosis.

However, Thrower points to CBD topicals as a potential solution for fighting localized pain in MS patients

This form of the disease is marked by worsening symptoms from the beginning, without flare-ups or remissions typical to other types of MS.

Cannabis is made up of compounds called cannabinoids. The main ones studied for their therapeutic effect are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which gets you ‘high’, and cannabidiol (CBD), which doesn’t.

In November 2018, the UK government legalised cannabis for medicinal use, but also put a strict criteria in place for who could access it. Only specialist doctors are allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis, and so far only a handful of people have benefited from the change in law.

There’s a medically approved cannabis-based treatment called Sativex, but it doesn’t work for everyone. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland it’s approved for use on the NHS for ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ spasticity (muscle spasms and stiffness). But you can have it only if other treatments haven’t worked. It’s not yet approved in Scotland but we hope it soon will be.

One in five people with multiple sclerosis (MS) surveyed in 2014 told us they’d used cannabis to help with their symptoms. They said it can help with muscle spasms or stiffness (spasticity) and pain.

Some people with MS use cannabis in a variety of ways to help ease their symptoms.

This simple fact can be considered in one of two ways. On the one hand, the notion that the cannabinoid is recognized by the National Institute of Health as a neuroprotectant is virtually a signed, sealed, and delivered acknowledgment of its ability to treat multiple sclerosis.

After nerve fiber damage, scar tissue begins to form. This scar tissue can interrupt neurological communication between the brain and other parts of the body. Neural communication is vital for many functions in humans, including motor skills and behavior.

In this article, we’ll talk about how MS attacks nerve fibers and disrupts neurological pathways. We’ll also discuss how cannabidiol (CBD) may be able to influence these pathways. While one should not consider CBD oil for multiple sclerosis a cure, it may provide an alternative form of relief.

CBD Oil for Multiple Sclerosis: Is it the Real Deal?

Much research will be needed in order to understand any potential dynamic between MS and endocannabinoid deficiency.

As it turns out, not all CBD oils are exactly the same. While they all, of course, rely on cannabidiol as the active component, some specific tinctures have shown to be more effective at treating symptoms stemming from MS than have others.

The impossibly comical irony of the federal government owning a medically-viable patent to CBD, while maintaining a Schedule I status on the plant that it comes from , is a discussion that will have to wait for another time and another place. Whatever means an MS sufferer might have to go to in order to receive treatment and receive the parts of their life back that the disease took from them, though, is a decidedly small price to pay in the grand scheme of things.

A note on CBD for Multiple Sclerosis by Dr. Mosab Deen: