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cannabis oil containing thc

In addition to safety risks and unproven claims, the quality of many CBD products may also be in question. The FDA is also concerned that a lack of appropriate processing controls and practices can put consumers at additional risks. For example, the agency has tested the chemical content of cannabinoid compounds in some of the products, and many were found to not contain the levels of CBD they claimed. We are also investigating reports of CBD potentially containing unsafe levels of contaminants (e.g., pesticides, heavy metals, THC).

Despite the 2018 Farm Bill removing hemp — defined as cannabis and cannabis derivatives with very low concentrations (no more than 0.3% on a dry weight basis) of THC — from the definition of marijuana in the Controlled Substances Act, CBD products are still subject to the same laws and requirements as FDA-regulated products that contain any other substance.

We are aware that there may be some products on the market that add CBD to a food or label CBD as a dietary supplement. Under federal law, it is illegal to market CBD this way.

Some CBD Products are Being Marketed with Unproven Medical Claims and Could be Produced with Unsafe Manufacturing Practices

CBD products are also being marketed for pets and other animals. The FDA has not approved CBD for any use in animals and the concerns regarding CBD products with unproven medical claims and of unknown quality equally apply to CBD products marketed for animals. The FDA recommends pet owners talk with their veterinarians about appropriate treatment options for their pets.

The FDA is concerned that people may mistakenly believe that using CBD “can’t hurt.” The agency wants to be clear that we have seen only limited data about CBD’s safety and these data point to real risks that need to be considered. As part of the drug review and approval process for the prescription drug containing CBD, it was determined that the risks are outweighed by the benefits of the approved drug for the particular population for which it was intended. Consumer use of any CBD products should always be discussed with a healthcare provider. Consumers should be aware of the potential risks associated with using CBD products. Some of these can occur without your awareness, such as:

The FDA is committed to setting sound, science-based policy. The FDA is raising these safety, marketing, and labeling concerns because we want you to know what we know. We encourage consumers to think carefully before exposing themselves, their family, or their pets, to any product, especially products like CBD, which may have potential risks, be of unknown quality, and have unproven benefits.

Misleading, unproven, or false claims associated with CBD products may lead consumers to put off getting important medical care, such as proper diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. For that reason, it’s important to talk to your doctor about the best way to treat diseases or conditions with available FDA-approved treatment options.

Maybe you came to this article because you want to try CBD, but completely avoid any potentially adverse or intoxicating effects of THC. If this is the case, try a full-spectrum hemp, broad-spectrum CBD, or CBD isolate product.

So for these consumers, the question inevitably arises: Do CBD products contain THC?

If you’re interested in benefiting from the potential entourage effect when combining THC and CBD, begin with high-CBD/low-THC cannabis products. Check the ratio of CBD to THC, expressed on the label as something like 10:1, 5:1, 1:1, etc. It may take a bit of experimentation to find the ratio you prefer. It’s possible that CBD works better for some uses, and some people, in conjunction with THC.

Is CBD effective without THC?

In the earlier days of CBD product manufacturing, full-spectrum products were likely to contain higher levels of THC than 0.3%. But as the industry has matured, it’s now possible to find full-spectrum hemp products with all of the cannabinoids and terpenes found in hemp but no more than 0.3% THC. Just be sure the label says full-spectrum hemp, not marijuana.

It’s possible to consume CBD oil that has trace amounts of THC, but you may not sense any intoxicating effects. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

While there isn’t necessarily a guarantee that the trace amounts of THC in CBD oil won’t show up on a drug test, you really don’t need to worry about it. If you want to be completely sure that your CBD oil won’t result in a positive drug test, seek out raw CBD oil, CBD distillate, or other pure CBD products.

If you’re open to trying cannabis products that are high in CBD and low in THC, you may be interested to know that CBD has the potential to mitigate the intoxicating and potentially adverse effects of THC, while THC may contribute to or enhance the therapeutic effects of CBD. THC and CBD elicit responses from the human body by binding to cannabinoid receptors.

And indeed, given that both compounds are naturally present in hemp, it can be hard to remove all traces of THC. But should you be worried about CBD with THC, even if it’s just a tiny little amount?

If CBD with THC sounds like your thing, then you’re in luck. We here at Pure Kana – as well as many other reputable brands throughout the industry – offer an assortment of full-spectrum hemp products (oils, capsules, vapes, etc) that contain THC levels under 0.3%.

Understanding the Effects of CBD with THC

Although the amount of THC in full-spectrum CBD products is minuscule, they do present the potential, however small, of producing a positive drug test. To avoid this potential hazard, as we said, some folks simply opt for THC-free products (like our PureKana gummies).

However, CBD is completely non-intoxicating in the sense that it does not produce any kind of a high. This is the primary difference between the two cannabinoids. Unfortunately, a lot of folks out there think that any CBD oil with THC will result in a mind-altering experience. This is simply not true.

Of course, some CBD oils that are derived from hemp will still contain trace amounts of THC. What does this mean? Is it bad? Will it affect you negatively in some way?