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can you take too much cbd oil

“Studies have found that CBD causes few side effects,” Dr. Vergnaud says. CBD doesn’t contain any THC, the active ingredient in cannabis that gets you high. But, she explains, people treated with Epidiolex, the only FDA-approved medication containing CBD, experienced side effects like drowsiness, changes in appetite, and fatigue. Children who’ve accidentally eaten a bunch of gummies or CBD products have been treated for breathing problems, according to a 2020 study published in Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, but it doesn’t appear to have caused them lasting issues.

“Pure naturally-occurring CBD — the non-psychoactive component of cannabis or marijuana — is widely believed by health and medical experts to be safe, with no risk of overdose or dependency,” Dr. Sophie Vergnaud M.D., a clinical specialist with GoodRx, tells Bustle. “However, it’s important to understand the potential health risks and side effects before using any CBD product and talk to a healthcare professional about determining an appropriate dosage that’s right for you.” Too much CBD for you might be just the right amount for your best friend.

Ultimately, if you’re wondering if you can overdose on CBD, know that there doesn’t appear to be a high risk of it; in fact, studies show CBD could actually help people recover from overdoses of drugs like cocaine and opioids. But even though CBD oil that only contains CBD will not get you high, taking more that a therapeutic dose will likely just make you want to take a nap.

How CBD Affects Your Body

CBD comes in a variety of delivery methods, including gummies, drops, sprays, applicators, vaporizers, softgels, and more. Dr. Vergnaud notes that aside from Epidiolex, no CBD products have been FDA-approved, and non-regulated products might contain all kinds of nasties, like pesticides and heavy metals. If you’re looking for a CBD product, she recommends finding a trustworthy brand that publishes lab test results of its products, and doing your research; sites like CBD Oil Review can help you assess different brands.

It’s also important to note that just because it’s unlikely that you can consume enough CBD oil to endanger your health, taking too much CBD could still make you feel weird as heck. Also, a study published in Cannabis and cannabinoid research in 2017 found that CBD oil is known to interact with certain medications, so make sure to consult your doctor or pharmacist if you’re currently taking any prescriptions. Dr. Vergnaud adds that CBD isn’t a good idea for pregnant people, because there aren’t any studies to indicate that it’s safe.

Maybe you’ve considered trying the cannabis compound cannabidiol (better known as CBD) lately as an all-natch way to deal with things like anxiety, insomnia, or chronic pain. If you’re taking CBD, perhaps you’ve also Googled: Can you take too much CBD? In order for CBD to be toxic to your system, you would have to ingest almost 20,000 mg of CBD oil in less than a day, according to a 2011 study published in the journal Current Drug Safety. For context, a single gummy might contain around 10 to 30mg — but that doesn’t mean you can pop them one after another like candy.

With the 2018 Hemp Act, part of the 2018 Farm Bill, signed Dec. 20, 2018, all products derived from industrially farmed hemp grown in the U.S. became legal in all 50 states, ending a more than 80-year ban of large-scale hemp farming in this country. In the years since, CBD products have hit the mainstream, and it’s become easier for researchers to test CBD and its effects, which was previously difficult because of federal regulations around hemp. But scientists aren’t yet 100% conclusive on CBD’s effects — and it’s important to educate yourself before getting started.

The most commonly reported negative effects of CBD are sleepiness, nausea, and dry mouth. When you take too much of this cannabinoid, it’s reasonable to expect these negative effects to intensify.

Pretty much everything on planet Earth is toxic in the right quantities. In human biochemical research, toxicity is defined as the amount of a substance that can cause bodily harm. There are no such things as inherently “toxic” substances — even cyanide, widely considered to be one of the most potent poisons, is not harmful in extremely low concentrations .

Can CBD be lethal?

We’ve established that CBD can only become toxic under the most extreme and absurd circumstances. Can you still take too much CBD, however, even if you don’t take enough to make this cannabinoid toxic?

New CBD consumers may note negative effects at lower doses. Ffor CBD users who have become accustomed to this cannabinoid, negative effects may only set in at higher doses.

Just remember — moderation is the key to success with any substance.

A 2017 review of clinical research published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research confirmed that CBD is generally very safe, particularly when compared to other drugs. In general, the biggest risk you likely run if taking a huge dose of CBD may be getting sleepy as the cannabinoid can have tranquilizing effects in large doses.

In short, probably not, but there are associated risks. CBD is recognized as having a number of anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, and neuroprotective qualities, many of which can have positive effects on a broad range of health conditions. However, it’s still important to fully grasp not only the positive ways CBD can affect you, but also any of the potential side effects that may accompany the cannabinoid.

Can CBD oil kill you?

Of course, other factors could complicate the effects of CBD and could be responsible for adverse reactions. For example, adverse effects could stem from an interaction between CBD and the patient’s existing medications.

The woman had reported consistent use of other CBD products over a 5-year period prior to this incident and it is unclear whether the new spray caused her to develop Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, though the authors of the report suspect that it did. The patient, however, had a complex medical history including coronary artery disease and hypertension, so linking her death directly to CBD may not illustrate the full picture.

The key to dosing is figuring out how it affects your unique body. Every person is different, and since researchers have not identified any precise doses, the best thing to do is start slowly and pay attention to how your body reacts.