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can cbd give you diarrhea

Cannabidiol (CBD), is one of more than 110 cannabinoids found in marijuana. It is also available in large quantities in industrial hemp. CBD is non-intoxicating (meaning children can use it), and some experts link it with the alleviation of symptoms ranging from headaches to anxiety.

In one study* that assessed the use of coconut oil (from which MCT oil is derived) for improving cholesterol, some participants reported diarrhea as a side effect. Other oils have also been known to be effective as a laxative, such as castor oil. And there have been reports* that people following an MCT ketogenic diet have side effects including bloating, cramping, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Why Am I Getting Diarrhea from CBD Oil in the First Place?

Aside from not causing a psychoactive high, CBD has few side effects. Still, there is a possibility of getting diarrhea from using too much CBD oil. This seems a little odd since some use CBD to successfully treat the symptoms of gastrointestinal issues (i.e. Irritable Bowel Syndrome). Other commonly reported side effects of CBD include tiredness and changes in appetite and weight.

In actual fact, most discuss CBD in the context of it helping with stomach issues rather than causing them. When the cannabinoid binds to the CB1 receptor in your endocannabinoid system (ECS), it reduces excessive gastric acid,* increases blood flow to your stomach lining to speed up the healing process,* and aids the lower esophagus in preventing reflux.* CBD may also help heal the digestive tract.*

Some doctors are not as “convinced” as others when it comes to the clinical efficacy of CBD. Still, it is more than worth it to try and speak with a general practitioner or healthcare provider about implementing CBD into your lifestyle. CBD (and cannabis in general) are becoming increasingly accepted. As such, more and more physicians are educating themselves as to the compound’s uses and applications.

there’s more to it than that, though. diarrhea, constipation, upset stomach, and ibs all have their claims of some interaction with cbd. so what are they, and do they hold any validity?

    dosage size – while cbd is completely safe and you cannot overdose on it, a large dose of cbd may result in an upset stomach and/or loose stool, especially if it is among your first times taking it. if your body is not used to its endocannabinoid system (ecs) becoming activated, diarrhea could be a possible reaction. the truth is, every person has a different body chemistry and we are still at the forefront of learning how our ecs is interrelated with all of the other systems in our body due to the legal status of cannabis over the better part of the last century.

does cbd cause diarrhea?

lastly, it is important to remember that the body’s natural condition is to have regular bowel movements. constipation is a sign that the body is out of homeostasis, a condition that cbd helps the body maintain. cbd helping with constipation may also be attributed to its overall homeostatic effects.

we’re not afraid of poop over here. everybody poops. or at least we hope they do! anyways, pooping is one of the many things that cbd oil is said to be related to. reports exist of users experiencing the ability to poop more regularly, but they also exist in the opposite manner as well, with effects such as constipation or diarrhea. we figured we’d set the record straight in one place and answer the following question as thoroughly as we could: does cbd make you poop?

diarrhea is a commonly-associated side effect to cbd. there could be a handful of reasons why a person who consumes cbd would get diarrhea, and some of the could be related to cbd while others are likely not. let’s take a look.

Of course, a lower oral dosage of 400 milligrams, for example, could still trigger diarrhea in some individuals. Height and weight may also play a role. In addition, dietary habits, exercise frequency, and general health may influence whether taking CBD oil leads to diarrhea or not.

Specifically, Bogdan mentioned that CBD oil vape pens, as well as tinctures and dabs, have relieved her symptoms. She advised against the consumption of edibles for people coping with ulcerative colitis because, “Our digestive tracts don’t function well, therefore we may not be able to absorb the medication into our systems via chewing and swallowing.”

In 2018, results of randomized CBD trials were published in the journal CNS Drugs. In these trials, CBD was found to have a high level of tolerance with minimal adverse effects. Similar to the Epidiolex trials, these studies showed that diarrhea was among the most common side effects of CBD and occurred more frequently in individuals on a regimen of the cannabinoid than those taking a placebo. Researchers reported that the effects ranged from mild to moderate, with no severe cases.

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How many milligrams of CBD would qualify as excessive? That depends on the individual, but a rule of thumb is that 500 milligrams or more is a high dose of CBD. Rollins continued, “When I reduced the dose or just rubbed the CBD oil on my hands instead of swallowing it too, I didn’t have any problems with nausea or diarrhea anymore.”

Other researchers agree. Dr. Timna Naftali, a gastroenterology specialist at Tel Aviv University’s Meir Hospital in Israel, studied the effects of a treatment with 15% CBD and 4% THC on patients with Crohn’s disease. Naftali found that 65% of patients experienced clinical remission and improved quality of life after eight weeks of cannabis treatment.

For some people, CBD oil and other cannabis products may help alleviate diarrhea and other symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). According to a 2016 literature review published in the journal Gastroenterology & Hepatology, cannabis and CBD may be used therapeutically to treat IBD. The authors of the review expressed concern for the side effects of cannabis on IBD patients, but ultimately concluded, “A significant portion of IBD patients, particularly those with severe disease, use cannabis to relieve symptoms of pain, nausea, and appetite and to improve their overall mood.” It is worth noting that the researchers focused on cannabis overall and not specifically CBD products.

One 2019 report, published in the journal Current Neuropharmacology, discussed the effects of CBD based on clinical trials of the FDA-approved drug Epidiolex, which is derived from CBD and prescribed to treat severe cases of childhood epilepsy. It also looked at the use of Epidiolex to treat psychiatric problems. The researchers determined that diarrhea was among the most common adverse effects for individuals taking Epidiolex to treat epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. They noted, however, that the incidence of any side effect was low compared to other drugs used to treat such conditions.