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alabama cbd oil laws

Alabama is well-known for its tough laws on marijuana use but the use of hemp-derived CBD with trace amounts of the psychoactive compound THC is completely legal thanks to federal legislation passed in 2018 legalizing hemp.

Usually, CBD is well-tolerated by the body, but it can produce side-effects such as nausea and fatigue as well as make people irritable. There has not been enough rigorous scientific research to say what constitutes an effective dose

The big takeaway for buying CBD oil in Alabama is: do your homework. The CBD oil market is relatively new in Alabama compared to many other US states so you want to purchase from a reputed, trustworthy source that uses industrial hemp to make its products. Buying online also gives you the chance to shop around for the best quality, products and prices and examine lab reports on the items sold by companies.

Tips To Choose The Right CBD Oil Suit You

If you’re wondering where you can buy CBD oil in Alabama, the answer is everywhere — from various online sites to brick-and-mortar stores. Just as in the rest of the US, the popularity of hemp-derived CBD as a health-and-wellness supplement in Alabama has skyrocketed since 2018 when Congress passed legislation legalizing its use federally. Hemp-sourced CBD is used to treat anxiety, pain, stress, seizures and help people living with such illnesses as MS, It’s now available in Alabama in an array of products from oils and edibles to pet treats and bath bombs.

Thanks to a state bill signed in 2019, pharmacies have been able to join other Alabama retailers in selling CBD oils and other products?

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Alabama, though, still has some of the toughest marijuana laws on its books in the US, and consumption of marijuana-derived CBD oil is illegal in the state. So you want to make sure you’re buying hemp-derived CBD, sourced from industrial hemp containing just trace amounts of THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis. Oil sourced from hemp delivers the medical benefits from cannabis to users but not the high found in marijuana-based products.

As the popularity of CBD continues to rise, Alabama becomes home to more and more CBD oil stores, with the largest concentrations in the most important cities such as Birmingham, Montgomery, Mobile, Tuscaloosa, and Huntsville. If you live near Hoover, Dothan, Decatur, Auburn, or Madison, the chances are that you will find some quality shops there, too.
So, if you’d rather not buy CBD online, we’ve profiled several heads and vape shops in Alabama where you can potentially find Cannabidiol.

If you want to find a trusted CBD oil company, check if they source their CBD from organic, certified industrial hemp, extract their Cannabidiol with CO2, and provide customers with third-party lab testing results to prove the purity and potency meets the label claims.

Buying CBD oil online is easy, fast, and convenient. And because the majority of CBD providers are wholesale, you can buy high-quality CBD oil products in bulk at affordable prices. Moreover, buying CBD oil online gives you access to a broad range of different products infused with cannabidiol, including tinctures, balms, extracts, concentrates, isolates, edibles, and pet care products.

Best CBD Oil Stores in Montgomery, Auburn, and Alexander City

Following the 2018 Farm Bill, CBD sourced from industrial hemp is federally legal and applies to all states. Hemp-derived CBD oil falls under the same importation and commerce regulations as other hemp products.
In 2016, the policy HB 393 was enacted to permit hemp cultivation for industrial purposes in Alabama. This legislation permits Alabama companies to create hemp cloth, paper, fuel, and other goods. Industrial hemp is not considered a controlled substance by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

The skyrocketing popularity of CBD oil has reached the doors of all 50 states, and Alabama, although not the most sought-after state when it comes to cannabis, followed suit. There is a great demand for CBD oil in Alabama due to its natural wellness and health-enhancing benefits. Luckily, there are plenty of stores where you can purchase a bottle of CBD oil in Alabama, but before we get to that part, it’s great to learn what kind of CBD is legal in the state.
Shall we?

Alabama is one of those states where you don’t want to be caught with marijuana. Possessing any amount of marijuana or its derivatives for personal use is typically penalized with a misdemeanor, carrying up to one year in prison or a $6,000 fine.
Currently, Alabama’s medical marijuana program is still pending and has not been officially enacted. However, CBD has been legal in Alabama since 2014, when the first study on Cannabidiol was conducted at the University of Alabama. When the researchers discovered and examined its benefits, the state’s authorities decided to permit the use of CBD oil if a person suffers from one of the qualifying conditions, such as severe seizures.
In June 2016, Leni’s Law came into force, allowing THC in CBD oil for the aforementioned conditions. However, Leni’s Law allows CBD products to contain up to 3% THC.

However, because the CBD oil industry is very loosely regulated, it’s of paramount importance to keep an eye on shady companies. They usually offer cheap CBD oil, which, they claim, is a miracle worker for every disease. While it’s perfectly okay to brag about your extraction skills and other qualities that could convince someone to buy from you, lying is a big no-no! CBD is a versatile wellness product, we’re not going to argue with that, but nobody has ever invented a one-fits-all solution for all diseases, mind you.

The Alabama Industrial Hemp Research Program required applicants to submit all materials and application fees annually, including criminal background checks. Growers and processor applicants must pay a $200 application fee and a $1,000 annual fee upon approval.

Alabama consumers can purchase CBD products both in-person and online. Typically, CBD products are sold at CBD-specific shops and wellness and health food stores. In Alabama, pharmacies can sell CBD products over the counter, as long as they are sourced from legal producers and contain no more than 0.3% THC.

Cannabidiol is a non-intoxicating molecule found in cannabis. It is the second-most abundant-cannabinoid in the plant after THC and has many potential therapeutic benefits, including analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressant properties. CBD can be sourced from either marijuana or hemp plants.

Testing Requirements

In July 2019, Republican Gov. Kay Ivey signed SB 225, which redefined and rescheduled CBD to align with federal definitions and allowed Alabama pharmacies to sell CBD products.

Consumers may also purchase CBD products online, typically directly through a specific brand’s website. Many online checkout processes work for CBD companies based in the United States, but some online processors consider CBD as a “restricted business,” so not all payment methods may be available.

As the FDA slowly determines the rules around CBD’s legality, the buzzwords and descriptors on a product’s label could raise potential red flags about a product’s quality or content. How a CBD product is labeled and marketed plays a critical role in whether the FDA determines it to be lawful, so it’s important to understand what certain words or numbers indicate.

In 2018, Congress passed the Farm Bill and legalized hemp cultivation, creating a pathway to remove cannabis from Schedule 1. The Farm Bill defined hemp as cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC by weight and marijuana as cannabis with more than that amount. Hemp-derived CBD was thus removed from its Schedule 1 designation, but CBD derived from the marijuana plant is still considered federally illegal because of marijuana’s federally illegal status. Hemp is considered an agricultural commodity, but still must be produced and sold under specific federal regulations, which were not finalized when hemp was legalized.